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Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Issues
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  • IPR IN CHINA/ Introduction to Trademark Registration in China TOP
    Date: 08/15/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: This manual is intended to provide guidance for the registration of trademarks, collective or certification marks, in China. It is not intended to provide legal advice. Applicants seeking to register their trademarks, collective or certification marks, in China should insure they seek appropriate professional advice.
  • IPR: What are Geographical Indications TOP
    Date: 07/19/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: In order to register a U.S. geographical indication in China it must be protected in the United States first. There is no separate registration process for geographical indication. Once protected in the U.S., a geographic indication can be registered in China as a certification mark or a collective mark.
  • Protect your Trademark... before Someone else Trades Your Mark TOP
    Date: 06/05/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: China's rapid growth in production, income and spending has led to a commensurate growth in demand for food and other products. While quality U.S. food products often make it to store shelves, an estimated 20-30 percent of products are counterfeit. China's "first-to file" system requires no evidence of prior use or ownership, leaving registration of popular foreign marks open to third parties. Foreign companies that have established themselves in China include protecting their intellectual property as an integral part of the cost of doing business. This means registering your trademark with the China trademark office, and ensuring you understand as well as use the progressive enforcement mechanisms available in China to stop infringers.
  • Protecting Plant Varieties in China: Alternatives TOP
    Date: 05/09/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: There are three methods to protect the intellectual property of plant products in China: 1) trademark, 2) method patent, and 3) new plant variety right.
  • Measures for Administration of Geographical Indication Signs Products TOP
    Date: 04/24/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: The State Administration for Industry and Commerce (SAIC) issued the "Measure for Administration of Special Signs of Geographical Indication Products", indicating Geographical Indications (GI) as signs of products which have been registered with the SAIC's Trademark Office.
  • Protecting Your Intellectual Property Rights TOP
    Date: 04/24/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: China¡¯s rapid growth in production, income and spending has led to a commensurate growth in demand for food and other products. While quality U.S. food products often make it to store shelves, an estimated 20-30 percent of products are counterfeit. Big companies that have established themselves in China include protecting their intellectual property as an integral part of the cost of doing business. This means registering your patent, copyright or trademark with the appropriate Chinese registration office, and ensuring you understand and use the progressive enforcement mechanisms available in China to stop infringers.
  • Going to China?: Trademark your Intellectual Property Now! TOP
    Date: 03/27/2007 ~ 01/01/1900
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: United States producers lost more than $84 billion last year from intellectual property rights infringements in the People¡¯s Republic of China. Automobiles, sports equipment, drugs, food and other agricultural products all suffer. The more a product is recognized as a quality product, the more likely it is to be counterfeited and sold in the local market, in other countries, or even re-exported to the U.S. China is rapidly developing the tools necessary for you to protect your intellectual property, however. A very small investment of time and money can provide large dividends and future protection.
    Total 1 Page(s) / Page 1 / Jump to: [1] Select year:
     

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