Advanced Search
Search Tips
 
News
Activities
 
Key Issues
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) - ��Mad Cow Disease��
Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD)
Avian Influenza (AI)
Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Issues
Food Safety
Commodities
Cotton
Dairy
Grains
Fish and Seafood
Forest Products
Fruits and Vegetables
Livestock and Poultry
Oilseeds
Planting Seeds
Processed Foods
Sugar
Tropical Products
Wines and Spirits
Organic Products
Tobacco
General Information
Regulations
Import Procedures
APHIS/AQSIQ Issues
Custom Duties
WTO Obligations
Labeling
Protocols
Marketing Services
Trade Shows in China
Market Briefs
City Profiles
Trade Leads
Buyer Alerts
Exporter Guide
 
 
Market Briefs
Total 10 Page(s) / Page 7 / Jump to: 3Pre. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] Next4 Select year:
  • Trade Data of January to March, 2006 TOP
    Date: 05/15/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: This report presents China Customs agricultural, fishery, and forestry commodity trade data recorded from January to March 2006. Year to date agricultural, fishery, and forestry imports were $9.5 billion of which, $2.3 billion originated from the United States. Leading imports from the world were cotton, soybeans, untreated wood, natural rubber, and palm oil. China��s agricultural, fishery, and forestry exports were $8.4 billion, primarily processed aquatic products, corn and woodenware. The top twenty-five import and export commodity categories for China have remained relatively consistent with previous reports. March witnessed the first percentage increase, in comparison to the same time of previous year, in the value of China��s agricultural, fishery, and forestry imports from the United States since December 2004.
  • Trade Data of January to February, 2006 TOP
    Date: 04/14/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: This report presents China Customs agricultural, fishery, and forestry commodity trade data recorded from January to February 2006. Year to date agricultural, fishery, and forestry imports were $5.5 billion of which $1.2 billion originated from the United States. Leading imports from the world were cotton, soybeans, untreated wood, natural rubber, and palm oil. China��s agricultural, fishery, and forestry exports were $5.2 billion, primarily processed aquatic products, corn and woodenware.
  • Trade Data of January, 2006 TOP
    Date: 04/04/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: This report presents China Customs agricultural, fishery, and forestry commodity trade data recorded in January 2006. Year to date agricultural, fishery, and forestry imports were $3.0 billion of which, $635 million originated from the United States. Leading imports from the world were soybeans, cotton and tobacco leaves. China��s agricultural, fishery, and forestry exports were $3.1 billion, primarily processed aquatic products and wooden products.
  • Harbin Market Profile TOP
    Date: 03/24/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: Known as China��s Winter Wonderland, Harbin has quickly emerged as a major regional market for Northeast China, and beyond. The Northeast has gone through a series of dramatic changes, yet renewed and government-led initiatives have revitalized the economy of Harbin, and surrounding Heilongjiang Province. Traditionally cosmopolitan and commercially oriented, Harbin is the major trade, transportation, and communications hub for North China with a wealth of natural resources, bountiful supply of skilled labor and excellent positioning on the Chinese-Russian Far East border right next to Korean and Japan. Harbin offers considerable market opportunities for U.S. food, and agricultural products.
  • All China Retail Annual Report TOP
    Date: 03/21/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: The retail food industry continues to grow and modernize as hypermarkets, supermarkets and convenience stores displace wet markets and other traditional outlets. Distribution systems have not kept pace however, and penetration of imported foods into the retail market remains relatively low.
  • Mainland China HRI sector Annual Report TOP
    Date: 03/17/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: As one of the earliest sectors opened to foreign investment, China's Hotel Restaurant and Institutional (HRI) sector continued to enjoy phenomenal and sustained growth in 2005 with revenues totaling US $110 billion. While the sector continues to undergo significant change, branding, franchising, off-site catering, informational technology, and portion control are all increasingly playing a role. Prosperous urban consumers are also changing with preferences moving rapidly toward healthy, nutritious, fast, and safe menus. High-end HRI markets have moved well beyond traditional major markets of Beijing, Guangzhou and Shanghai and into China's major Emerging City Markets (ECM).
  • North China Retail Update TOP
    Date: 03/10/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: North China's retail food sector continues to undergo dramatic change, with traditional wet markets rapidly being replaced with supermarkets, hypermarkets and convenience stores. Rising incomes has enabled mid-upper class consumers to try and use high quality imported food products on a continuing basis. Improved distribution and logistics are providing greater access for suppliers to penetrate this lucrative retail market.
  • January to December Trade and Analysis for 2005 TOP
    Date: 02/27/2006
    Website: E-mail:
    Highlight: This report analyzes China's calendar year 2005 agricultural, fishery, and forestry commodity trade using recently released China Customs data. China's imports of these commodities reached $36.7 billion of which, $7.2 billion originated from the United States, who remains the largest importer. Imports consist primarily of soybeans, cotton, palm oil, wood, and rubber. Exports went up to $33.7 billion for the year, consisting primarily of processed aquatic, corn and forestry products. This report updates information from CH6003, China's January to November trade. At the eight-digit HTS level, soybean import remains the greatest by value ($3.2 billion) of China's imports from the United States in all goods.
    Total 10 Page(s) / Page 7 / Jump to: 3Pre. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] Next4 Select year:
     

    FAS Home | USDA.gov | Economic Research Service (ERS) | World Agricultural Outlook Board (WAOB) | Trade Links | Site Map
    FOIA | Accessibility Statement | Privacy Policy | Non-Discrimination Statement | Information Quality | FirstGov | White House


    2005 U.S. Embassy, China, Office of Agricultural Affairs
    �����ţ���ICP��05072096�� Technical Support��Flying Studio